Pragmatism Goes to Church by A.W. Tozer (via worthytofollow)

A. W. Tozer was born April 21, 1897  and died at age 63 on May 12, 1963. He was a Preacher, a writer, a speaker and a mentor to many. This article, in which he refers to the popularity of pragmatism at the beginning of the century thus isn’t talking about this century but the last one. Pragmatism is, in a nutshell, doing what works and it is very popular today among many of the churches in our nation, among many of the writers, speakers and preachers who regularly pour out their words either verbally or on paper. Men such as Rick Warren and many, many others. Thus it is the daily and/or weekly diet of millions of professed Christians in this nation. Sadly it is the wrong approach as what matters in spiritual issues isn’t that we are doing what works but that we are doing whatever it takes to please God. Mr. Tozer knew that and thus he wrote what you read here:

 

It is not by accident that the philosophy of pragmatism around the turn of the century achieved such wide popularity in the United States. The American temperament was perfect for it, and still is.

Pragmatism has a number of facets and can mean various things to various people, but basically it is the doctrine of the utility of truth. For the pragmatist there are no absolutes; nothing is absolutely good or absolutely true. Truth and morality float on a sea of human experience. If an exhausted swimmer can lay hold of a belief or an ethic, well and good; it may keep him afloat till he can get to shore; then it only encumbers him, so he tosses it away. He feels no responsibility to cherish truth for its own sake. It is there to serve him; he has no obligation to serve it.

Truth is to use. Whatever is useful is true for the user, though for someone else it may not be useful, so not true. The truth of any idea is its ability to produce desirable results. If it can show no such results it is false. That is pragmatism stripped of its jargon.

Now, since practicality is a marked characteristic of the American people they naturally lean strongly toward the philosophy of utility. Whatever will get things done immediately with a maximum of efficiency and a minimum of undesirable side effects must be good. The proof is that it succeeds; no one wants to argue with success.

It is useless to plead for the human soul, to insist that what a man can do is less important than what he is. When there are wars to be won, forests to be cleared, rivers to be harnessed, factories to be built, planets to be visited, the quieter claims of the human spirit are likely to go unregarded. The spectacular drama of successful deeds leaves the beholder breathless. Deeds you can see. Factories, cities, highways, rockets are there in plain sight, and they got there by the practical application of means to ends. So who cares about ideals and character and morals? These things are for poets, nice old ladies and philosophers. Let’s get on with the job.

Now all this has been said, and said better, a few dozen times before, and I would not waste space on it here except that this philosophy of pragmatism has had and is having a powerful influence upon Christianity in the middle years of this century. And whatever touches the faith of Christ immediately becomes a matter of interest to me and, I hope, to my readers also.

To read in full, please go to http://worthytofollow.wordpress.com/2011/10/21/pragmatism-goes-to-church-by-a-w-tozer-god-tells-the-man-who-cares-from-the-best-of-a-w-tozer-1980-pgs-254-256-2/